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Parker: The Outfit

[Note: Check This $#!% Out was originally a seperate blog but is now a feature of patokon blog]

This comic is the total $#!%!
If you like hard-boiled or film noir or heist movies or bad-ass mofos who know how to get the job done, then you just might fall in man-love with Parker.

He's plans jobs, as in heists. He's one of the best. Even so, there are always factors that can make a job go south. Richard Stark's bad-ass bad guy Parker was introduced in "The Hunter", and in "The Outfit" he's back. With all the money he spent on his new face, he needs a new job, badly. Even though there are a few details he doesn't like about the armored car job that falls in his lap, he needs the dough. The first half of the book tells how that job went. And it went bad, but it was all good. For the reader anyway. The second half deals with The Outfit, a NY-based mob that wants Parker outta the way. WAY outta the way.
Darwyn Cooke's art makes Stark's words sing!
Though I feel like someone kicked me in the head and threw me down the stairs, getting my copy of The Outfit a few moments ago has made my day!
I plan to get back into bed and rip through this baby before coming back to Mundanity, the awful land of reality where I have to clean my apartment, do the laundry, do WORK, and pay some bills! Back to Parker!

Do yourself a favor and check out these high quality hardcover comics (graphic novels, whatever) and lemme know whatcha think. The Outfit collects "The Man with the Getaway Face" and "The Outfit" in duo-chromic (that means two colors, d.a.) perfection. See what inspired a whole generation of neo-noir filmmakers like Tarantino, and writers like Stephen King.
I dare ya.

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