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DSC 16 - Silver Surfer plus John Buscema

John Buscema is an amazing artist and really exemplifies "the Marvel look" for people of my generation. His Conan is THE Conan and his Silver Surfer is THE Surfer for me. Reading his interview in the John Buscema Sketchbook that came out a few years ago, I'm convinced that besides being a master of storytelling, he's also a really decent human being. He doesn't hesitate to gush over the artists he truly respects - Frazetta, Al Williamson, Jeffrey Jonescomics,art,Inktober,weapon x,sketch,heroine,dailysketchchallenge,drawing,X-23,marvel,wolverine, etc. I found it extremely interesting that he says he outgrew Burne Hogarth (famous Tarzan artist and creator of several books that many comics artists learn from) saying he was "too stiff" and "more involved with muscles than the movement of the figure" and that he prefers Hal Foster and Alex Raymond
Of Jack Kirby he says "he's number one then, today, and in the future". 

Here's today's daily sketch challenge. It's a Buscema-inspired Silver Surfer with Kirby Krackle!
I'm really psyched about how the Krackle turned out, but the figure could use some work. 

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