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Third Naruko Kokeshi Exhibit @ Gates Inn Gallery U

I stopped by Gallery U today, but first I got all spiffed up in a kimono. 
Being the incredibly humble artist that I am, I made a beeline for my own work before even glancing at the other works. 
I was glad to see my Kokeshi were in a good spot, but the overall level was so high, though proud to be in such esteemed company, I'm not sure how I measure up. 

Let's look at some of the dolls I thought were extremely cool. 

These dolls by Etsuko Kurimori really show off the beauty of the wood and incorporate a fresh, natural style. 

I love the damaged schoolgirl motif and also the style used here, which while tackling popular manga/anime tropes uses a clean, original style. The animals held by the girls are great additions  

Of the figures here by Masaya Miyashita, the Nature one really caught my eye, but I'm a sucker for moon motifs as well. 


Speaking of moon motifs, these three moon dolls by Tomoko Miyakawa are just gorgeous. I love the deep blue and how the characters follow the moon phase progression. 

Growth was a common theme and a natural one as we were all given a set of three differently-sized dolls to work with.
Check out the growth cycle of the frog by Kyoko (Sakai?)
 

There were all different sorts of designs including abstract, highly graphical, and traditional. This kabuki set by Taeko Oda was quite eye-catching so I'll finish with it. 

The exhibition continues until next Sunday at 4, and I'll be there then. 
Gallery U is just a short walk from Matsudo station. It's the top left brown square in the map below. 

Hope to see you there!

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